The Further Apart Things Seem

Anna Binta Diallo, Atanas Bozdarov, Barbara Hobot, Adriana Kuiper & Ryan Suter, Brendan Lee Satish Tang, and Couzyn van Heuvelen

Co-curated by Shannon Anderson and Jay Wilson

University of Waterloo Art Gallery
September 15-December 10, 2022
Opening Reception: Thursday September 15, 5-8 pm
Curator’s Walk-Through: Thursday September 29, 12-1 pm

In a social and political moment where opinions are often divisive, the possibility of finding common ground can seem beyond reach. Debates over human rights, climate change, land claims, and even the politicizing of the pandemic often seem at cross-purposes and irresolvable. How do we respond in times of uncertainty—when do we push forward, when do we give up, and when do we try things differently? In The Further Apart Things Seem, artists follow distinct paths toward subtle forms of resistance, while exploring areas of connection between that which feels disconnected or in opposition. By testing the unexpected, they embrace material experimentation and provisionality as productive spaces for building resilience, resolution, and understanding.

The Further Apart Things Seem is co-presented by Contemporary Calgary, University of Waterloo Art Gallery, and Art Gallery of Mississauga.

The exhibition is generously supported by the Ontario Arts Council.

Artist’s Biographies

Atanas Bozdarov (b. Etobicoke, ON, lives in Toronto, ON) is an artist and designer whose recent projects have explored systems of access and accessibility, unnoticed conditions of disability and design, and architectural propositions for public space.

Anna Binta Diallo (b. Dakar, Senegal, lives in Winnipeg, MB) is a multidisciplinary visual artist who draws from her complex cultural background to explore the continuously evolving processes of memory and nostalgia to create unexpected narratives surrounding identity.

Barbara Hobot (b. Toronto, lives in Kitchener, ON) is interested in creative processes and actions that de-centre the human, using loose trompe l’oeil, alchemy, gravity, and chance, to create a confusion of materials that draws attention to our incomplete grasp on the world that surrounds us.

Adriana Kuiper (b. Toronto, ON, lives in Sackville, NB) and Ryan Suter (b. Tilbury, ON, lives in Sackville, NB) have collaborated on work since 2010. Their work turns to the interior lives of those coping with fear and conflict, between a desire to retreat and a need to speak out in their quilt-based sculptures.

Brendan Lee Satish Tang (b. Dublin, Ireland, lives in Vancouver, BC) explores issues of identity and the hybridization of material and non-material culture in his work, drawing from futuristic technologies, contemporary culture, and ancient traditions.

Couzyn van Heuvelen (b. Iqaluit, NU, lives in Bowmanville, ON) explores Inuit culture and identity, new and old technologies, and personal narratives. While rooted in the traditions of Inuit art, the work strays from established Inuit art making methods and explores a range of fabrication processes.


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Image Credit: Brendan Lee Satish Tang, “Roadside Tribute (large installation)”, 2021, watercolour on paper, wood, mixed media, courtesy of the artist.
Description: A full-sized paper and watercolour reproduction of a blue and white Ford F-150 pick-up truck is mounted on wooden sawhorses with a glowing amber light emanating from underneath.