Charlene Vickers | Quill Violet Christie-Peters | material + time

Exhibitions Now On View / 2022
Kenderdine Art Gallery and College Art Galleries
University of Saskatchewan

Charlene Vickers
Big Blue Smudge

College Art Gallery 1, University of Saskatchewan
January 21 – April 22, 2022
curator, Leah Taylor

Big Blue Smudge presents recent paintings and new large-scale sculptural works by Charlene Vickers, an Anishinaabe artist based in Vancouver, British Columbia. Vickers’ work explores memory, healing and embodied connections to ancestral lands.

The paintings in this exhibition employ vivid colours to convey a sense of strength and action, while also asserting an Indigenous presence. Her work responds to the Coast Salish land she has resided on for the last 30 years, while simultaneously acknowledging her deep connection to Wauzhushk Onigum in Northwestern Ontario, the place where she is from. For Vickers, territory is a place of existence rather than one of ownership, and her conceptual concerns include meditations on power, protection, reclamation and kinship.

Image: Charlene Vickers: Big Blue Smudge, exhibition installation image, College Art Gallery 2, University of Saskatchewan, 2022. Photograph by Carey Shaw.


Quill Violet Christie-Peters
spilling out, spilling over

College Art Gallery 2, University of Saskatchewan
January 14 – April 22, 2022
curator, Leah Taylor

spilling out, spilling over is comprised of recent painting by Quill Violet Christie-Peters, an Anishinaabe artist and scholar based in Northwestern Ontario. Her work conceptualizes “spilling over boundaries” through Anishinaabekwe practices, moving beyond the material plane to a spiritual form of art-making.

Christie-Peters contemporizes the tradition of Woodlands style painting, often depicting her own body in states of self-pleasure to represent loving acts of reclamation, agency, sovereignty, and spiritual connection. With evident urgency, she interrogates settler colonialism, holding accountable the capitalist structures that are created on, and occupy, stolen Indigenous land. Her work centres on Anishinaabe futurisms by looking at how ancestral relationships will inform and shape the trajectories to decolonial futures, particularly in the context of displacement and urban Indigenous realities. Influenced by her father, artist Ron Peters, spilling out, spilling over includes several of Peters’ key works, presenting the two artists in-conversation.

Image: Quill Violet Christie-Peters, making my homelands shake and feel good too, 2018, acrylic on canvas, exhibition installation image, College Art Gallery 1, University of Saskatchewan, 2022. Photograph by Carey Shaw.


material + time

January 24 – April 15, 2022
Kenderdine Art Gallery, University of Saskatchewan
Organized by Cole Thompson

Drawn from the University of Saskatchewan Art Collection, material + time presents divergent associations with structural modes, moving away from static moments – the blueprint, the cross section, the flow chart – towards an understanding of structure as an ongoing process of dissolution. Considered against the backdrop of social, historical, cultural, and affective entanglements, forms perceived as stable in stasis become malleable in duration. Architecture crumbles, technology become obsolete, and systems deteriorate or fail.

Artists in material + time include Vikky Alexander, Ralph Allen, Carl Beam, Jill Crossen-Sargent, Paul de Guzman, Gay Outlaw, Cherie Moses, David Rokeby, Victor Vasarely, Margot Wawra, Elizabeth Willmott, Jack Wise and Morgan Wood, with additional material courtesy of the University of Saskatchewan Archives and Special Collections and the City of Saskatoon Archives.

Image: Vikky Alexander, La Fenetre, Versailles, 1996, Cibachrome on paper. Collection of the University of Saskatchewan. Exhibition installation image, Kenderdine Art Gallery, University of Saskatchewan, 2022. Photograph by Carey Shaw.


Accessibility:
The Kenderdine Art Gallery is located in the Agriculture Building and is wheelchair accessible with elevator access, free to all public audiences. Tours are available upon request.

The College Art Galleries are located in the Peter MacKinnon Building and are wheelchair accessible with elevator and ramp access, free to all public audiences. Tours are available upon request.

Kenderdine Art Gallery/College Art Galleries
University of Saskatchewan
107 Administration Place
Saskatoon, SK Canada S7N 5A2
Instagram: @kagcag
www.art.usask.ca

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