Summer 2023 Exhibitions at Oakville Galleries: Timothy Yanick Hunter, Julia Brown and Leisure

Oakville Galleries is thrilled to announce its exhibition program for summer 2023, with solo exhibitions by Timothy Yanick Hunter, Julia Brown, and Leisure. An array of public programs will be presented at both gallery sites throughout the exhibitions.

Summer Exhibitions Opening Reception

Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens and at Centennial Square
Saturday, 3 June 2023 | 2:00 – 5:00 PM

Artists Leisure and Timothy Yanick Hunter will be in attendance at Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens. All are welcome. Join us for remarks and refreshments!

Oakville Galleries is pleased to offer a free shuttle bus to our guests during the opening reception! The bus will run between Centennial Square and Gairloch Gardens. For additional details and bus schedule, please visit oakvillegalleries.com for updated information.

Summer 2023 ARTbus: Exhibition Tour

Saturday 3 June 2023, 11:30 AM – 5:00 PM

Pick-up and drop-off at Gallery TPW in Toronto. Get your ticket on Eventbrite!
$10 minimum donation includes transportation to all galleries and afternoon refreshments

In partnership with Gallery TPW and the Art Gallery of Mississauga, Oakville Galleries invites you to join us for the Summer ARTbus tour of 5 exciting exhibitions in the GTHA.

Beginning with BLACK(cite), a group exhibition curated by Rinaldo Walcott at Gallery TPW, the ARTbus will continue to the Art Gallery of Mississauga to tour the solo exhibition of Jorian Charlton, Between Us. Then it’s off to Oakville Galleries, where participants will celebrate the opening reception of solo exhibitions Leisure: Having Ideas by Handling Materials at Oakville Galleries in Centennial Square and Timothy Yanick Hunter: Collapse and Incompletion and Julia Brown: American Vernacular at Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens.


Timothy Yanick Hunter: Collapse and Incompletion

Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens
3 June – 2 September 2023

Working across painting, sculpture, video, performance, and installation, Toronto-based artist Timothy Yanick Hunter views media as a range of languages that can be drawn upon and experimented with to re-envision storytelling. For Collapse and Incompletion, his first solo exhibition in a public museum, Hunter will present a new series of installations that investigate historical material and synthesize physical and digital archives. A nod to notions of collective and diasporic memory, this exhibition will see Hunter evolve his work into new forms of multidisciplinary experimentation, such as multi-channel video installation, sculpture, and fabric prints, that respond to the space and setting of Gairloch Gardens by Lake Ontario.

Collapse and Incompletion is commissioned by Oakville Galleries with the support of Partners in Art.


Julia Brown: American Vernacular

Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens (Salah Bachir Gallery)
3 June – 2 September 2023

In the Salah Bachir Gallery screening space, Oakville Galleries will be showing American Vernacular, a film installation by Baltimore-based artist Julia Brown. The single-channel film comprises six scenes; in each, a pair of actors perform the function of a “Black Americana” historical object. This act of personification makes visible the objects’ entanglements with race, class, and lived space. Set in period rooms of different eras, Brown’s film depicts the fantasies, desires, and violence embedded in the racial imaginary that persists to this day.


Leisure: Having Ideas by Handling Materials

Oakville Galleries at Centennial Square
3 June 3 – 30 December 2023

Leisure is a collaboration between Montreal-based artists Meredith Carruthers and Susannah Wesley. Working together since 2004, they use a wide range of media, including video, sculptural installation, and text. Their practice considers ideas of connection, collaboration, creativity, and relation, and in the past has often highlighted the work of overlooked women, such as the landscape architect Cornelia Hahn Oberlander and playwright Lina Loos. For their exhibition at Oakville Galleries, they will draw on educational theories articulated by artist Barbara Hepworth’s son Simon Nicholson, to create an exploratory, participatory space for children and visitors of all ages. Particularly relevant is his essay The Theory of Loose Parts, which advocates for children to have freedom over their play environments. Here this becomes a potentially transformative proposition with wider implications in society at large, asking us to rethink how we make, exhibit, and experience art—and ultimately how we lead our daily lives.


About Oakville Galleries

A contemporary art museum housed in two gallery spaces and located 30 km west of Toronto, Oakville Galleries is one of Canada’s leading art museums, with a primary commitment to presenting the work of early and mid-career artists from across Canada and around the world.

Oakville Galleries operates with support from the Canada Council for the Arts, the Ontario Trillium Foundation, the Ontario Arts Council, an agency of the Government of Ontario and the Corporation of the Town of Oakville, along with our many individual, corporate and foundation partners.

Oakville Galleries in Gairloch Gardens and at Centennial Square
905.844.4402 | info@oakvillegalleries.com | oakvillegalleries.com | @oakvillegalleries

Images:
1) Timothy Yanick Hunter, Volcanic Spine (detail), 2021. Ceramic, slate tile, acrylic,
transparency paper. Photo: James Limit. Courtesy of the artist.

2) Summer 2023 ARTbus combined promo image, details, left to right: Wayne Salmon, Braids, Regent Park, 23 x 16 inch gum bichromate over cyanotype, 2005. Courtesy of the artist; Jorian Charlton, Nyabel & Nevine, 2021. Courtesy of the artist and Cooper Cole; Timothy Yanick Hunter, Volcanic Spine (detail), 2021. Ceramic, slate tile, acrylic, transparency paper. Photo: James Limit. Courtesy of the artist; Julia Brown, American Vernacular (film still), 2007. Courtesy of the artist; Leisure, Having Ideas by Handling Materials, 2022, digital print on archival paper, 48 x 36 inches. Courtesy of the artist.

3) Julia Brown, American Vernacular (film still), 2007. Courtesy of the artist.