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FALL EXHIBITIONS LAUNCH

Thursday 20 September 2018
Members’ Preview: 5–6 pm
Public Reception: 6–7:30 pm

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The Season Launch Reception on Thursday 20 September celebrates Tau Lewis: when last you found me here; The hold: movements in the contemporary collection; In the Present: The Zacks Gift of 1962 and Printmakers at War, 1914–1918. All open on 25 August.


TAU LEWIS: WHEN LAST YOU FOUND ME HERE

The Agnes presents when last you found me here, Tau Lewis’s first institutional solo exhibition in Canada. In this recent body of sculptural portraits, visionary speculation lends her transmutation of salvaged materials a raw and moving imaginary. These gatherings of figures and narrative fabric patchworks include poignant “bulletproof” characters born of alternate geographies that re-articulate black bodies and nature. Lewis’s works disclose magnitudes of unbelonging; they are at once aberrant bodies and fantastical vessels for ancestral communication. Charged with time capsules of secret sacrificial objects, they make their way to a space of joy and magic.

Tau Lewis is the 2018 Stonecroft Artist-in-Residence. A 13-week artist’s residency project is a rich platform for her artmaking process that connects her ideas and work with public and academic audiences. The residency is supported by the Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts, the Queen’s University Department of Gender Studies through the Queen’s Visiting Artist-in-Residence Arts Fund, and the BFA (Visual Art) Program.


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THE HOLD: MOVEMENTS IN THE CONTEMPORARY COLLECTION

A second iteration of the ongoing The hold series, this exhibition focuses on movement, drawing works from the collection that approach themes of migration and restriction, ableism and access, class and incarceration, social movements and global oppression. The exhibition includes works by John Abrams, Stephen Andrews, Shuvinai Ashoona, Carole Condé and Karl Beveridge, Shary Boyle, Napoleon Brousseau, Luc Courchesne, John Dickson, Will Gorlitz, Freda Guttman, Geoffrey James, Kingston Residents of the Prison for Women, Jeneen Frei Njootli, William Strang, Jinny Yu and Natalie Majaba Waldburger.

Kingston artist and researcher, Dr Lisa Figge was consultant on the formation of the exhibition.


IN THE PRESENT: THE ZACKS GIFT OF 1962

“The importance of this collection cannot be ignored because it shows the very best pieces of contemporary painting—the expression of a time.”
—André Biéler, director, Agnes Etherington Art Centre, 1962

In the Present features Canadian paintings, drawings and sculptures that were donated, soon after they were made, as part of a larger gift from Samuel and Ayala Zacks. Cutting edge in 1962, these works provided a major boost to the fledgling gallery, then five years old, and continue to be a core of collecting strength for the Agnes.

The Zacks gift captures a vibrant moment in Canadian art and reflects the spirit of an age on the cusp of cultural change. Artists were exploring tensions between abstract and figural expression, in a bohemian world of beat poetry, cool jazz and existential thought. Meanwhile, the Space Race, Cold War, civil rights movement, Cuban Revolution and Quiet Revolution unfolded in the news.

Represented in the exhibition are artists from across Canada, with works dated 1958 to 1962, including Ron Bloore, Jack Bush, Graham Coughtry, Marcelle Ferron, Richard Gorman, Anne Kahane, Roy Kiyooka, Jock Macdonald, Robert Markle, Jean McEwen, John Meredith, Gordon Rayner, Jean Paul Riopelle, William Ronald, Michael Snow, Harold Town and Tony Urquhart.


PRINTMAKERS AT WAR, 1914–1918

World War I (1914–1918), the first global conflict, shifted the paradigm of war. With millions of casualties across the continents, the Great War ended empires and overturned the collective understanding of the limits of human potential for violence. The centenary of the war’s conclusion in November 2018 offers a moment to commemorate the sacrifice and suffering of those who experienced it.

Among those who were profoundly affected by the war were artists. Through the medium of print, they conveyed the horrors of the new mechanized warfare, the razing of cities, and the annihilation of landscapes. Printmakers at War highlights some of the most devastating and poignant images of that period, from those who served and those who remained on the home front. Some printmakers were already established at the start of the war, while others achieved recognition through their innovative visual approaches to a gruesome subject. All of the artists represented sought to express the acute anguish prompted by the four years of intense conflict.

Featured artists include Cyril Barraud, Muirhead Bone, Kerr Eby, William Lee Hankey, Martin Hardie, Gertrude Hermes, James McBey, Paul Nash, Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson, and Percy John Delf Smith.

This exhibition is made possible through the support of the George Taylor Richardson Memorial Fund, Queen’s University.


CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

To 2 December 2018: Artists at Work: Picturing Practice in the European Tradition

To 12 April 2020: The Art of African Ivory



The Agnes Etherington Art Centre is a platform for teaching and learning at Queen's University that also serves as Southeastern Ontario’s public art museum.

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Agnes Etherington Art Centre
36 University Avenue, Queen’s University
Kingston, ON K7L 3N6
www.agnes.queensu.ca
Facebook: aeartcentre
Twitter: @aeartcentre
Instagram: @aeartcentre

Agnes Etherington Art Centre is an accessible venue, more details can be found here.

THE AGNES THANKS Queen’s University, the Canada Council for the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, City of Kingston Arts Fund through the Kingston Arts Council, Ontario Arts Foundation, Government of Canada, and Lloyd Carr-Harris Foundation, along with funds held at Queen’s University, including: The Bader Legacy Fund, Isabel & Alfred Bader Fund of Bader Philanthropies, David and Patti Bain Memorial Fund, Janet Braide Memorial Fund, Celebrating Agnes Fund, Dodge Family Indigenous Art Collection Research Fund, Franks Fund, Rita Friendly Kaufman Fund, Justin and Elisabeth Lang Fund, David McTavish Art Study Fund, Chancellor Richardson Memorial Fund, George Taylor Richardson Memorial Fund, John L. Russell and Gerald Brenner Fund, Iva Speers Fund for Art Education, and Stonecroft Foundation for the Arts Fund. We are grateful for the crucial ongoing support of our members, and corporate and private donors.


Image: Tau Lewis, Boom bang (shiny girl), 2018, mixed media. Collection of the artist. From the exhibition Tau Lewis: when last you found me here.

Image: Jinny Yu, Don’t They Ever Stop Migrating?, 2015, ink on fabric and sound. Purchase, the Canada Council for the Arts Acquisition Grants program and the Donald Murray Shepherd Bequest Fund, 2016 (59-012). Photo: Darrell Edwards. From the exhibition, The hold: movements in the contemporary collection

For further information, contact Kate Yüksel at (613) 533.2190 or kate.yuksel@queensu.ca.

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