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image
Charlie Engman, Mom in the Badlands, 2014. Courtesy of the artist.

Charlie Engman
Mom

May 3 – June 16, 2018
Opening Tuesday May 3, 7pm
Artist Talk, May 3, 6pm
Scrap Metal, 11 Dublin St

For nearly a decade, Charlie Engman’s mother has willingly, sometimes hesitantly, experimented in front of his camera. She has donned makeup, stylized hair, high-fashion clothing—or a complete lack thereof—for his pictures and films, in the way that many mothers selflessly offer themselves up to their children so that they do not go without. In the case of the quasi-collaborative, long-standing photographic project simply titled, Mom, Engman’s mother has stepped into the role of muse and mannequin, coming out as stranger on the other side—stranger because Engman does not always recognize who he sees dancing, shuffling, and posing before his lens. She is his mother, but images reveal she is "more, more, more".

The New York-based Engman is a highly sought-after photographer, although not initially by his own ambition. Trained originally as a movement artist, Engman arrived at picture-taking as a form of visual notation. His singular sensibility has produced intrigue and demand—experimental publications, mainstream magazines, and fashion brands alike have published his photographs.

Engman’s solo exhibition at Scrap Metal reveals the breadth of Mom through various modes of photographic representation, including framed and floating images as well as archival materials. Broadening the project's reach, four of Engman’s photographs will be presented in public space on billboards at Dupont and Davenport.



Originally from Chicago and currently based in Brooklyn, Charlie Engman completed a degree in Japanese and Korean Studies at the University of Oxford. Formerly involved professionally in theatre and dance, he began using photography primarily as a note-taking device. Engman’s commissioned work has appeared in publications such as AnOther Magazine, Dazed, Garage, Pop, T: The New York Times Style Magazine, Unemployed, and Vogue. His clients include Adidas, Hermès, Kenzo, Nike, Opening Ceremony, Pucci, Sonia Rykiel, Stella McCartney, and Vivienne Westwood.

Read more about this exhibition and others at the CONTACT website.



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Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival
80 Spadina Avenue, Suite 205
Toronto, Ontario M5V 2J4
T 416 539 9595
info@scotiabankcontactphoto.com
scotiabankcontactphoto.com
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CONTACT fosters and celebrates the art and profession of photography with an annual Festival in May and year-round programming in the CONTACT Gallery.

CONTACT, a not-for-profit organization founded in 1997, is generously supported by Scotiabank, Nikon Canada, Pattison Outdoor Advertising, La Fondation Emmanuelle Gattuso, Vistek, Dentons Canada LLP, Toronto Image Works, The Gilder, Transcontinental PLM, 3M Canada, BIG Digital, Waddington's Auctioneers and Appraisers, Four By Eight Signs, Beyond Digital Imaging, Steam Whistle Brewing, Art Toronto, The Gladstone Hotel, First Gulf, Colliers International, The Globe and Mail, NOW Magazine, CBC Toronto, and Canadian Art.

CONTACT gratefully acknowledges the support of Celebrate Ontario, Ontario Ministry of Tourism, Culture and Sport, Ontario Arts Council, The Government of Ontario, Partners in Art, Canada Council for the Arts, Consulate General of the United States, the Howard Webster Foundation, Mondriaan Fund, Istituto Italiano di Cultura, Goethe-Institut, the City of Toronto through the Toronto Arts Council, and all of our funders, donors, and programming partners.

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