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VERTICAL FEATURES SCREENING SERIES ANNOUNCES JANUARY AND FEBRUARY SCREENINGS

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Transmission from the Liberated Zones (Filipa César, 2015)

Vertical Features is a non-fiction screening series that presents contemporary and historical works of documentary, essay films, and artists’ films.

JANUARY SCREENING

The Archival Investigations of Filipa César
Co-presented by Goethe-Institut Toronto.

Tuesday 17 January
Doors and Coffee: 6:30pm
Screening: 7:00pm
FREE
Image Arts Building (IMA 307), Ryerson University

Program:
Cacheu (2012, Portugal, 10min, Digital)
Conakry (2012, Portugal, 11 min, Digital)
Transmission from the Liberated Zones (2015, Portugal/France/Germany/Sweden, 30min, Digital)
Porto, 1975 (2010, Portugal, 10min, Digital)

For over a decade Filipa César has been producing a rich body of video and installation works responding to Portugal’s geopolitical history. By turns works of historical intervention, media archeology, and hybrid performance, the films in this program respond to and activate their archival sources through performances equally dense and dazzling.

The first three films, Cacheu, Conakry, and Transmission from the Liberated Zones—César’s most recent work, which debuted at the Berlin Film Festival— are taken from the artist's interdisciplinary Luta ca caba inca (The Struggle is Not Over Yet) project, informed by research in the Guinea-Bissau audiovisual archive. In these films César connects archival findings and personal testimonials to broader legacies of (moving) images and anti-colonial struggle. Porto, 1975, the program’s final film, is no less choreographed but sees César moving from a contained studio space to the Bouça housing complex in an effort to trace political volatility in Portugal itself, an examination of history impressed in architecture.

Read “Filipa César: Projectiles”, an original essay by Zoë Heyn-Jones on the Vertical Features site.

Facebook event.


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La France est notre patrie (Rithy Panh, 2015)

FEBRUARY SCREENING

La France est notre patrie + The Horses of a Captain Cavalry

Tuesday 21 February
Doors and Coffee: 6:30pm
Screening and presentation 7:00pm
FREE
Image Arts Building (IMA 307), Ryerson University

Program:
The Horses of a Cavalry Captain (Die Pferde des Rittmeisters) (Clemens von Wedemeyer, 2015, Germany, 10 min, Digital)
La France est notre patrie (Rithy Panh, 2015, Cambodia/France, 75 min, Digital)

Despite consisting of images fixed in celluloid, no film is ever static, something especially true in the case of documentaries. The two films in this program each work with found footage in order to usurp and reimagine their materials' initial (and intended) meanings—meanings tied to histories of colonialism and conquest. Utilizing voice-over, text, and editing the films emphasize the polysemy of images, while engaging in broader histories of circulation and engaging the spectator as an active participant in meaning-creation.

Clemens von Wedemeyer’s short film The Horses of a Cavalry Captain (Die Pferde des Rittmeisters)—part of the artist’s extended P.O.V. project—adopts footage shot by his grandfather, a Nazi cameraman and part-time equestrian. Through an analysis of propaganda images von Wedemeyer re-reads the films’ horses as a subtle, subversive metaphor.

La France est notre patrie by Cambodian-born Rithy Panh (The Missing Picture) continues the filmmaker’s examination of his country’s fraught history through an assemblage of footage shot in French Indochina through 1954. Punctuated by ironic mock silent film intertitles by writer Christophe Bataille vaunting the colonial project ("France has brought the light and intellect of its laws”), the violence inherent in the assumed-neutral footage is writ especially clear.


ABOUT VERTICAL FEATURES

Vertical Features takes its name from Peter Greenaway’s 1978 featurette Vertical Features Remake. A fictional documentary that also borrows from the language of structural film, Greenaway’s experiment serves to trouble claims of authenticity and authorship, issues still relevant in the world of documentary and other non-fiction media, especially as it moves online and into the gallery.

The name Vertical Features serves to evoke the idea of work that exists adjacent—even perpendicular—to conventional cinema, works that risk oversight. The series hopes to promote vital non-fiction film and video that has had little or no Toronto exposure, including documentary, essay films, hybrid experiments, and artists’ moving image. Contemporary films are placed in dialogue with historical rediscoveries. Supplemented by introductions and discussions with guest scholars, artists, and critics, Vertical Features serves to highlight and situate these exceptional works.

All screenings FREE and open to the public.

The screening venue is wheelchair accessible.


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Christopher Allen presenting Union Docs’ Living Los Sures Project.

PREVIOUS SCREENINGS
November - Los Sures presented by Christopher Allen (Union Docs, Brooklyn)
December - The Illinois Parables (16mm) and Baba Dana Talks to the Wolves

Future screenings to be announced soon!

CONNECT

Website: http://www.verticalfeaturesto.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/verticalfeatures
Email: verticalfeaturesto@gmail.com