CANADA'S ONLINE SOURCE FOR VISUAL ART INFORMATION
SUBSCRIBE TO AKIMBO     //     LOGIN
akimbo
app
 
ABOUT AKIMBO     //     CONTACT US
  • 01
  • 2
  • 3
THE NEXT 7 DAYS:     EVENTS (15)     +     OPENINGS (8)     +     DEADLINES (18)     +     CLOSINGS (11)
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
copyright ©2018
akimblog

email EMAIL this page to a friend:





http://akimbo.ca/akimblog/?id=645

close

Ontario
Kim Neudorf
Kelly Wallace at Michael Gibson Gallery in London
January 15, 2013

Highly controlled, self-generating compositions in graphite on board make up the majority of Kelly Wallace's recent work currently on view at Michael Gibson Gallery. The drawings depict fictional landscapes in various states of fragmentation, which the artist in part seems to equate with the formal conceit of repeated vertical lines, breaking every drawing into intricate segments that mimic their own rigid pixilation.



Kelly Wallace, Light Mass (detail), 2012, lead on paper on wood

In an artist talk during the opening, Wallace stated a devotion to the "slowness" of drawing space compared to cinematic space. He explained how combining the unpredictable motion of drawn line with mathematic precision could evoke/simulate such close attention. These comments had the affect of an earworm, as if the exhibition had suddenly been saturated with laundromat/grocery aisle lite rock via the mid-to-late-70s (preferably a few dreaded, dogged Doobie Brothers hits). Amidst this conventional backdrop, I was surprised by a few of the works' insistence on opening up a temporal, inclusive space of drawing on its own terms.

In six drawings of trees and water in a range of sizes, Wallace's self-imposed rules seem to dissolve into a suggestion of potential, rather than mechanical, landscape. One of the smallest drawings turns the organic into a wild pattern, appearing at first as if from an aerial view, and then as if composed through the perspective of a Medieval tapestry. In another, the merged boundaries of drawn line and texture seem to avoid being merely clichéd effects. In both drawings, line and tone are bare, subtle plays between landscape as a genre and as a space for thought.


Michael Gibson Gallery: http://www.gibsongallery.com/
Kelly Wallace: Level Grounds continues to February 2.


Kim Neudorf is an artist and writer currently living in London, Ontario. Her paintings have shown widely in Alberta, including the Illingworth Kerr Gallery, Stride Gallery, and Skew Gallery in Calgary. She has contributed writing to FFWD, shotgun-review.ca, Prairie Artsters, Hamilton Arts & Letters, Stride Gallery, Truck Gallery, and most recently Susan Hobbs Gallery. She is Akimbo's London correspondent and can be followed @KimNeudorf on Twitter.

 

0 comments

back [+]

 

Comments (newest first)      +click to add comment